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Wednesday, May 6, 2020 | History

3 edition of Shifting cultivation and alternatives found in the catalog.

Shifting cultivation and alternatives

Daniel M. Robison

Shifting cultivation and alternatives

an annotated bibliography, 1972-1989

by Daniel M. Robison

  • 3 Want to read
  • 37 Currently reading

Published by C.A.B. International in association with CIAT, Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical in Wallingford, U.K .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Shifting cultivation -- Bibliography.

  • Edition Notes

    Includes index.

    Statementcompiled by Daniel M. Robison and Sheila J. McKean.
    ContributionsMcKean, Sheila J.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsZ5074.S53 R63 1992, S602.87 R63 1992
    The Physical Object
    Paginationv, 281 p. ;
    Number of Pages281
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL1342992M
    ISBN 100851986803
    LC Control Number92228962
    OCLC/WorldCa26665426

      A simple Quora post may not be enough to answer this question as there are various types of cultivation. I have summed up some of the most important and widely applied practices below. 1. Subsistence agriculture. Many farmers in India follow subsi. Shifting cultivation is practiced in much of the world's Humid Low-Latitude, or "A" climate regions, which have relatively high temperatures and abundant rainfall. Shifting cultivation is practiced by nearly million people, especially in the tropical rain forests of South .

    Description Summary. Shifting cultivation (slash and burn jhum) is widely practiced by farmers in the hill regions of the North-Eastern states of implemented in a sustainable way for generations, this system of subsistence agriculture is now facing many challenges and there is an urgent need to identify suitable alternatives.   A Story of Shifting Cultivation - Duration: Alejandro De M views. Shifting Cultivation - Duration: Indigenous Community Video Collective - NE India Recommended for you.

    Soil under shifting cultivation in eastern Himalaya Book. Jan ; in NEI through providing food grains to the shifting cultivator as an alternative to shifting cultivation. GECM can be a. Shifting Cultivation. 86 likes. Scientist. Facebook is showing information to help you better understand the purpose of a Page.5/5.


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Shifting cultivation and alternatives by Daniel M. Robison Download PDF EPUB FB2

Shifting Cultivation and Alternatives: An Annotated Bibliography, [Robison, Dan M., McKean, Sheila J.] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Shifting Cultivation and Alternatives: An Annotated Bibliography, Cited by: This book brings together the best of science and farmer experimentation, vividly illustrating the enormous diversity of shifting cultivation systems as well as the power of human ingenuity.

Some critics have tended to disparage shifting cultivation (sometimes called 'swidden cultivation' or 'slash-and-burn agriculture') as unsustainable due to 5/5(1). Shifting cultivation, which is still prevalent in the uplands of eastern Bangladesh, contributes significantly to forest loss and is the main cause of land degradation.

This paper presents the causes and consequences of shifting cultivation and its potential land use alternatives. The analysis presented is primarily qualitative with a supplementary quantitative analysis of the causes of forest loss by logistic.

Alternative farming systems and the future of shifting cultivation. Alternatives which have been proposed as replacements for the natural bush fallow vegetation, such as alley farming, planted tree fallows and the intensive use of inorganic fertilizers to make continuous farming feasible, are presented and discussed in this chapter.

Shifting cultivation is a type of cultivation in which an area is cultivated temporarily for a period of time which differs from place to place and then abandoned for some time so that it restores nutrients in the plot naturally.

This is very essential for the fertility of the land. Shifting Cultivation, Livelihood and Food Security New and Old Challenges for Indigenous Peoples in Asia Shifting Cultivation, Livelihood and Food Security iii.

Finally, we would like to sincerely thank and dedicate this publication to the shifting cultivation and paddy fields are providing a safety net that allows engagement. Shifting Cultivation Shifting cultivation is the most ancient system of agriculture in which soil fertility is restored by long periods of fallowing rather than by off-farm inputs of fertilizers and amendments, nutrients are recycled between natural vegetation and crops, and ecological balance is maintained by adopting diverse and complex cropping systems rather than monoculture.

shifting cultivation in one way or another. The current climate change discourse has taken the debate on shifting cultivation to another, a global level, reinforcing existing prejudices, laws and programs with little concern for the people affected by them.

Now, shifting cultivation is bad because it causes carbon emission and thusFile Size: 1MB. Shifting Cultivation and It’s Alternatives For Sustainable Agriculture in Chittagong Hill Tracts [email protected] 2.

Introduction • Shifting cultivation(SC) in Bangladesh locally known as Jhum cultivation, is the land use practice in which indigenous communities clear and cultivate secondary forests in plots of different sizes, leave. The Shifting cultivation is a form of agricultural practice or a cultivation system in which an area of ground is cleared of vegetation and cultivated for a few years and then abandoned for a new.

An annotated bibliography covering three main areas: the effects of shifting cultivation, including studies on the cropping period and fallow period; sustainable low input alternatives to shifting. Shifting cultivation systems are ecologically viable as long as there is enough land for long (10–20 years) restorative fallow, and expectations of crop yield and the attendant standards of living are not too high.

These systems are naturally suited for harsh environments and fragile ecosystems of the tropics. That is why attempts at finding viable alternatives to shifting cultivation have. The present book attempts to document and systematize findings on shifting cultivation on a pan-tropical basis, drawing on major findings in the literature in the last five decades.

The current book examines the processes of secondary succession and soil fertility restoration under bush fallow within an integrative framework, and uses the core-periphery analogy to analyse the process and stages of.

Shifting cultivation is an agricultural system in which plots of land are cultivated temporarily, then abandoned and allowed to revert to their natural vegetation while the cultivator moves on to another plot.

The period of cultivation is usually terminated when the soil shows signs of exhaustion or, more commonly, when the field is overrun by weeds.

Mosaic landscapes under shifting cultivation, with their dynamic mix of managed and natural land covers, often fall through the cracks in remote sensing–based land cover and land use classifications, as these are unable to adequately capture such landscapes’ dynamic nature and complex spectral and spatial signatures.

But information about such landscapes is urgently needed to improve the Cited by: This paper presents the causes and consequences of shifting cultivation and its potential land use alternatives.

The analysis presented is primarily qualitative with a supplementary quantitative. Shifting Cultivation Policies book. Read reviews from world’s largest community for readers. Shifting Cultivation Policies: Balancing Environmental and Social Sustainability by.

Malcolm Cairns (Contributor) Rating details 0 ratings 0 reviews Trivia About Shifting Cultivat No trivia or quizzes : Malcolm Cairns. 1. Shifting cultivation and forest landscapes in the Amazon Lars Løvold Rainforest Foundation Norway 2.

Shifting cultivation • A widely misunderstood agricultural system: “Primitive, inefficient, environmentally destructive, major cause of GHG emissions” – “Slash and burn”.

CHAPTER: 1 – INTRODUCTION Introduction Shifting cultivation commonly known as Jhumming is one of the most ancient system of farming believed to have originated in the Neolithic period around B.C (Borthakur, D.N. It is also alternatively called as Slash and Burn method of cultivation.

Shifting Cultivation among the Thadou-Kukis of Manipur Food and agricultural Organization defined Shifting Cultivation as “the custom of cultivating / clearings scattered in the reservoir of natural vegetation (forest or grass or wood lands) and of abandoning them as soon as the soil is exhausted and this includes in certain areas File Size: 87KB.

Learn Shifting Cultivation with free interactive flashcards. Choose from 30 different sets of Shifting Cultivation flashcards on Quizlet.The shifting cultivation is briefly known as agriculture in the cultivate manner that is in the form of the Jhum.

In some regions of India, in the shifting cultivation, there is the use of agriculture which will be full of the slash-and-burn agriculture, migratory primitive agriculture, nomadic agriculture, hoe and burn, forest field rotation.This book brings together the best of science and farmer experimentation, vividly illustrating the enormous diversity of shifting cultivation systems as well as the power of human ingenuity.

Some critics have tended to disparage shifting cultivation (sometimes called 'swidden cultivation' or 'slash-and-burn agriculture') as unsustainable due to.