Last edited by Kazigul
Saturday, May 16, 2020 | History

3 edition of Oil seepages on the Arctic Coastal Plain, Alaska. found in the catalog.

Oil seepages on the Arctic Coastal Plain, Alaska.

Hanna, G. Dallas

Oil seepages on the Arctic Coastal Plain, Alaska.

by Hanna, G. Dallas

  • 310 Want to read
  • 10 Currently reading

Published by California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Alaska.
    • Subjects:
    • Petroleum -- Alaska,
    • Petroleum -- Geology -- Alaska

    • Classifications
      LC ClassificationsQ11 .C18 no. 38
      The Physical Object
      Pagination18 p.
      Number of Pages18
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL5891177M
      LC Control Number63025819
      OCLC/WorldCa2193674

      WASHINGTON - Opening Alaska’s Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to oil and gas development is one of the Trump administration’s top energy policy goals - one it vowed to complete before the end. Symposium February , University of New Mexico To view all sessions visit the WATCH ONLINE page. the last oil symposium at the University of New Mexico is the first national convening to address the misguided and reckless Arctic and offshore energy policy of the Trump administration, which endangers biological nurseries of global significance, violates indigenous human rights, and.

      Current State of Arctic Oil Drilling in the U.S. The U.S. government has been debating Arctic drilling since the discovery of oil in Prudhoe Bay. In , former President George W. Bush encouraged legislation to support drilling in his National Energy Policy. While the U.S. House of Representatives voted for such action, the U.S. Senate rejected all such bills. Surface water connectivity controls fish food web structure in Arctic Coastal Plain lakes; USGS Coastal Plain ( Area) and NPR-A Research Bibliography. Selected Bibliography of USGS Research Conducted in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) Coastal Plain ( Area) and/or the National Petroleum Reserve – Alaska (NPRA).

      The Trump administration said that oil drilling in part of Alaska’s Arctic National Wildlife Refuge would have a negligible environmental impact, clearing the way for lease sales to oil. Though the coastal plain where oil proponents wish to drill takes up a relatively small corner of the million-acre refuge, conservationists describe it as ANWR's most important and.


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Oil seepages on the Arctic Coastal Plain, Alaska by Hanna, G. Dallas Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. Oil seepages on the Arctic Coastal Plain, Alaska. [G Dallas Hanna; California Academy of Sciences,]. OIL SEEPAGES OF THE ALASKA ARCTIC SLOPEINTRODUCTION Seepages of Cape Oil seepages on the Arctic Coastal Plain, on the Arctlc coast of Alaska about southeast of Point.

Barrow,_ haye b~en rei>orted for many years. In,anareaof35,00~ square mi~es in this region wasd~signated as Naval Petroleum Reserve No. For several years thereafter, field. Government studies in the s estimated as much as 11 billion barrels of recoverable oil in the million acres of the refuge’s coastal plain, the area that could be opened to drilling.

J OIL SEEPAGES ON THE ARCTIC COASTAL PLAIN, ALASKA By G Dallas Hanna Curator Department of Geology California Academy of Sciences Introduction North of the Brooks Range in Arctic Alaska and beyond a belt of roll- ing foot hills, an area of very low relief covers more t square miles.

The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge’s (ANWR) coastal plain, or area, could hold billions of barrels of oil and natural gas, but the results of the only test well drilled in the refuge has been kept secret for decades. The “King of the Arctic,” Charles Brower, reported oil seeps along the Arctic Coast to the chief geologist of Standard Oil Company in the s.

A Wainwright teacher even filed oil claims for seepages he found at Cape Simpson, also in the ‘20s. Resource Development Special Section | Oil & Gas The First Oil Wells in the Alaska Arctic. Eskimos had known of oil seepages on the north coastal plain since time immemorial.

They had been reported by the English explorer Thomas Simpson in ,and Lieutenant W.L. Howard in In W. Peters and F. Schraeder, both veteran Alaska surveyors, mapped much of the western coastal area.

The coastal plain of the refuge, where oil drilling is proposed, is its biological heart. The million-acre region hosts nearly species of birds. Some of these species pass through Maine. Others, such as the long-tailed duck and American tree sparrow, nest and fledge their young in the Arctic and spend the winter in our state.

EFFECTS OF PETROLEUM POLLUTANTS ON ARCTIC MICROBIAL POPULATIONS RONALD M. ATLAS, EDMUND A. SCHOFIELD,* FRANK A. MORELLI~ & ROY E. CAMERON* Department of Biology, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky, USA A BSTRA CT Microorganisms encounter oil in the Arctic from natural seepages and accidental by: In Novembera draft report by the United States Fish and Wildlife Service recommended that all of the coastal plain within the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge be opened for oil and gas development.

It also proposed to trade the mineral rights ofacres (67, ha) in the refuge for surface rights toacres (, ha) owned by corporations of six Alaska native groups. COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus.

The Arctic Coastal Plains of Alaska are a flat wetland area of tundra, ponds, and meandering rivers and streams found in Alaska’s high Arctic. The region is home to a limited number of wildlife species that have adapted to live its extreme environment.

Many migratory bird species come to the plains to. The blog began with an analogy to the economic implausibility and national-security risks of oil* from the vast Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (called ANWR by Author: Amory B.

Lovins. Interior Dept. Moves Toward Selling Oil Leases in Arctic Refuge. Porcupine caribou on the coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in Alaska. coastal plain to oil and gas. The Natural History of an Arctic Oil Field synthesizes decades of research on these myriad impacts.

Specialists with years of field experience have contributed to this volume to create the first widely available synopsis of the ecology and wildlife biology of animals and plants living in close association with an actively producing oil field. When finalized, the environmental review will guide where and how oil leasing should happen in the Coastal Plain, also known as the area, a million-acre portion of the refuge.

Proposed oil and gas exploration within the coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska: Final environmental impact statement and preliminary final regulations by U.S.

Fish and Wildlife Service; Geological Survey (U.S.); United States. Bureau of Land Management. As I prepare for my fifteenth backpacking trip to the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, I ponder whether this will be my last one.

I am getting older, and more importantly, the Arctic Refuge’s precious coastal plain is under its most dire and imminent threat of being degraded by oil development. A federal agency on Thursday recommended a plan to offer the entire coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in Alaska for lease to oil.

Congress opened up the Arctic territory for oil leasing as part of the tax bill that passed in late Environmental groups fiercely oppose oil development on the refuge’s coastal plain. Hydrocarbons were known along the Arctic coast of Alaska at least as early aswhen A.M. (Sandy) Smith reportedly discovered the Simpson oil seepages.

This caused sufficient interest in the region by private oil companies to warrant a field party inled H.A. Campbell, which examined the Simpson seepages in some detail and staked. Some Republicans and energy companies have long sought access to the estimated 10 billion barrels of recoverable crude oil in the coastal plain of Alaska’s Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.

"Because if you offered the entire million acres of the Coastal Plain you'd have to get $ per acre from that lease sale in order to get to a billion dollars." He added, "If you only did.